End to Gaza war with guarantees from the US: Hamas reveals terms for hostage deal

Hamas demands permanent end to war guaranteed by the U.S., even if it breaks terms of the ceasefire agreement.

By World Israel News Staff

The Hamas terror group has responded to a ceasefire and hostage deal pushed by the Biden administration and the United Nations Security Council with extreme changes, dampening hopes that the agreement could lead to the release of some 120 Israelis kidnapped on October 7th who are still held hostage in the Gaza Strip.

Despite initially saying they viewed the U.S.-brokered proposal positively, representatives from Hamas have returned to international negotiators with radical amendments to the outline, many of which are considered non-starters by Israel.

“This is the most extreme response Hamas could have given,” an Israeli official told Hebrew-language Channel 13 News.

“It is apparent that the American pressure has not worked. It is hard to start a negotiation in these conditions.”

One demand is that Jerusalem commit to a permanent end to the war, even if Hamas breaks the terms of the ceasefire.

Hamas is requiring written guarantees from the United States, Russia, China, and Turkey that Israel will not resume fighting in the Strip, regardless of whether the terror group abides by the terms of the agreement.

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While reconstruction of the Strip was slated to begin in the third phase of the ceasefire agreement, Hamas is now demanding that it begin in the first stage.

Hamas is also demanding that terrorists released from Israeli prisons in the deal not be deported to the Gaza Strip or third countries; rather, the terror group wants released prisoners – including those convicted of murdering Israelis – to be returned to their places of origin, including in Judea and Samaria and pre-1967 Israel.

The terror group is also demanding that it will have the final say over all terrorists who are released in the deal, with Israel having zero veto power regarding specific prisoners. This essentially means that Hamas will be able to pick and choose exactly which prisoners will be freed, without Israel having the ability to keep particularly dangerous terrorists incarcerated.

Although Secretary of State Antony Blinken claimed that interlocuters may be able to “bridge the gaps” and secure an agreement, Jerusalem is expressing pessimism regarding the prospect of

“It’s hard to see how there will be a deal. From the point of view of the Israeli side, Hamas’ answer is rejecting the agreement,” an Israeli official told Ynet.