Israel to host 25,000 Ukrainian refugees until danger subsides

Should the fighting continue for more than three months, the Ukrainians will be allowed to remain and accept employment.

By World Israel News Staff

Israel will host about 25,000 citizens of Ukraine, Interior Minister Ayelet Shaked announced Tuesday.

In the first and immediate stage, Israel will grant temporary protection from repatriation for approximately 20,000 Ukrainian citizens who were present in Israel before the outbreak of fighting, most of them without any legal status.

“This will be until the danger subsides,” Shaked’s spokesperson said.

It was also determined that Israel will grant “entry and stay” for 5,000 additional Ukrainian refugees. Initially, they will be given a temporary visa for three months.

Should the fighting continue beyond this time, all those present in Israel will be allowed to remain in the country and accept employment.

“Every Ukrainian citizen who wants to come to Israel within the framework of the new program will be able to apply online through the Ministry of Foreign Affairs website. No other conditions will be required except for a short background check,” the spokesperson said.

“At the same time, Israeli citizens will be able to apply to invite Ukrainian citizens, up to one nuclear family per applicant, and they will be given priority as far as possible, in order to facilitate the hosting process in Israel.”

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Shaked said that in addition to the unprecedented number of Ukrainian citizens who may stay in Israel until the danger subsides, the country is expected to absorb in the coming weeks and months around 100,000 Ukrainians who are fleeing the fighting, within the framework of the Law of Return.

Ukrainians fleeing the war who have a Jewish background, along with their families, may come to Israel and receive full citizenship.

On Sunday morning, however, Shaked said that Israel is accepting Ukrainian refugees, the vast majority of whom are not Jewish, at unsustainable rates and that the government must take steps to curb the influx.