Pew poll reveals most US Muslims unaware of antisemitism

Only 17% of Muslims notice discrimination against Jews in the United States, a lower percentage than any other religious group polled. 

By Vered Weiss, World Israel News

According to a recent Pew Research poll, only 17% of Muslims notice discrimination against Jews in the United States, a lower percentage than any other religious group polled.

By contrast, 57% of Jews surveyed said they thought there was significant discrimination against Muslims in the US, the highest of any religious group besides Muslims.

However, this number signaled a decline from polls in 2020 and 2013 when 72% of Jews said Muslims in America faced significant discrimination.

Among the American population as a whole, the number who said that antisemitism was a major problem doubled in the past three years from 20% in 2021 to 40% in 2024.

In addition, 9 out of 10 Jews in America felt that there was a rise in antisemitism since October 7th, 2023.

A total of 74% of U.S. Jews and 60% of U.S. Muslims said they were offended by a story on the news or a social media post regarding the war between Israel and Hamas.

The Pew survey was conducted between February 13 and 25, 2024 and involved 12,693 respondents with a large number of Jews and Muslims represented and asked respondents about views on discrimination and free speech following October 7th and the ensuing war between Israel and Hamas.

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The poll found that both Jews and Muslims felt there was more discrimination against their respective groups since the beginning of the war, with more Jews agreeing with the statement (9 out of 10) than Muslims (7 out of 10).

In addition, most Americans were comfortable with allowing statements both for and against Palestinian and Israeli statehood (although the latter is already a country), but were uncomfortable with calls for violence against Jews or Muslims.

According to the survey, 71% said statements supporting the Jewish state should be allowed and 58% would allow free speech to those who oppose the existence of Israel.

Calls supporting a Palestinian state should be allowed according to 66% of the people surveyed, and 61% of the respondents would not forbid opposition to a Palestinian State.

However, only one in ten people said calling for violence against either Jews or Muslims should be allowed.