Survey: 72% of reserve IDF soldiers back Rafah invasion

The vast majority of reservists are opposed to hostage deal that would see thousands of terrorists freed.

By World Israel News Staff

The vast majority of Israeli reserve soldiers are staunchly opposed to a sweeping hostage deal that would see the release of thousands of terrorists and are in favor of an invasion of the Hamas stronghold Rafah, according to a new poll.

More than 300,000 reservists were called up after the Oct. 7th terror onslaught that triggered the current Swords of Iron War. Many have fought in Gaza and along the northern border with Lebanon for months, and a significant number of casualties have occurred amongst reservists.

According to a survey of more than 500 reservists, conducted by the Zionist NGO Regavim, found that an overwhelming majority are in favor of a hardline approach to the war that would see a decisive victory over the Hamas terror group.

The poll found that 72% of reservists are in favor of a wide-scale ground invasion of Rafah, which is a major Hamas stronghold in the southern Gaza Strip. The same percentage of respondents expressed that they were opposed to a hostage deal at any cost, which would involve the mass release of Arab terrorists from Israeli prisons.

Recent demonstrations by the families of hostages and their supporters have called for the government to agree to all of Hamas’ demands, in order to secure the release of the captives.

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While those demonstrators purport that their position is reflective of most Israelis’ opinion on the matter, it’s clear that reservists hold a different view.

Notably, almost 70% of reservists said they were unhappy with the manner in which the war has been managed.

Right-wing critics have pointed to the slow place and lack of decisive action as major failures in the ongoing fighting.

A striking 90% of reservists said they were opposed to the transfer of humanitarian aid into the Strip, which has frequently been seized by Hamas.

A third of respondents said they would support additional humanitarian aid if there was a guarantee it would not be stolen by the terror group.