Hamas rejects Israeli offer, demands full ceasefire

Hamas’ rejection of the Israeli offer came just hours after the U.S. failed to veto a UN resolution which demanded a ceasefire.

By World Israel News Staff

The Hamas terror group has rejected an Israeli proposal which would see a pause in the fighting and the release of hundreds of terrorists from Israeli prisons.

Instead, Hamas doubled down on their original demands for a total Israeli withdrawal from the coastal enclave and a permanent end to the war.

In a statement, Hamas blamed Prime Minister Benjamin “Netanyahu and his extreme government” for the “failure of negotiation efforts and for placing obstacles in the way of reaching an agreement until now.”

The terror group also said that they wanted a “real prisoner exchange deal.” This claim is significant, considering that recent reports indicated Jerusalem was prepared to release some 700 Palestinian terrorists – many of whom were convicted of murdering Israelis – in exchange for just 40 hostages.

Security blogger Abu Ali Express noted that Hamas’ rejection of the Israeli offer came just hours after the U.S. failed to veto a UN resolution which demanded a ceasefire, without a stipulation for the release of the hostages.

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Washington’s refusal to veto the UN call for a ceasefire may have signaled to Hamas that Israel’s closest ally is growing impatient with the ongoing conflict.

Recent comments by Vice-President Kamala Harris that the U.S. may levy “consequences” against Israel should the IDF invade Rafah could also have strengthened Hamas’ perception that Jerusalem is facing increasing international pressure to stop the fighting.

Before the rejection by Hamas, some Israeli officials had expressed cautious optimism regarding the prospects of an agreement.

“Right now, we’re feeling 50/50 about the chances for a deal,” a member of the Israeli negotiating team told The Times of Israel on Sunday.

According to the Times of Israel, the main snag in the talks hinges on the number of high-profile Palestinian terrorists Israel is wiling to release from its prisons.

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