‘Sharia Law tougher than Israeli law on rape,’ says father of 10-year-old Israeli raped by Arab

“The State of Israel has reverse racism towards its Jewish citizens,” said the father of a young girl raped by a Bedouin.

By World Israel News Staff

The father of a 10-year-old girl raped by a Bedouin intruder who broke into the family home told Israeli media that he believes the State of Israel is racist against its Jewish citizens.

Identified by Arutz Sheva by his first initial, A, the man expressed a common sentiment among residents of Israel’s Negev desert communities – that they feel abandoned by the state.

“The State of Israel has reverse racism towards its Jewish citizens,” he told Arutz Sheva.

“The Arabs claim that we are an apartheid state. That’s true, but only in the opposite direction. The apartheid is towards Jews. It’s unthinkable that there should be quick enforcement against a Jew who moves a millimeter out of bounds when in the Bedouin settlements the law doesn’t even exist – including in so-called ‘legal’ settlements.”

A said the Israeli criminal justice system is too lenient and opined that if his daughter’s attacker would be tried under Sharia Law, the chance for the victim’s family to see justice would be higher.

“I didn’t expect justice in this trial in the first place,” he said.

While the trial has not yet been completed, the father said that he expects his daughter’s rapist to get off with a light sentence.

“The State of Israel, when it comes to the issue of rapists, completely ignores and basically allows it. The chance that this person will receive an appropriate punishment is low, and even the maximum sentence is too low for such a crime. We have abandoned everything, and there’s no vacuum – and crime enters that space.

“I would have preferred the trial take place according to Sharia Law, because then the rapist would have received an appropriate punishment.”

Rampant crime, running the gambit from property theft to extortion and even murder, has turned the Negev into a no-mans-land where some parents are too afraid to send their children to school.

“For 10 years, I’ve been asking [the government] for agricultural land, and I haven’t received a response, while around us the Bedouin tend, like in Colombia, fields upon fields of drugs. That’s the situation in the south today,” A added.